GKA SOCIAL 2020

Key Dates

Congress: July 16-17th, 2020.

CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE
First Call for Papers until May 6, 2019
Second Call for Papers until October 1, 2019
Third Call for Papers until February 1, 2020
FINAL Call for Papers until June 1, 2020
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Super Discount Rate until June 3, 2019
Early Rate until October 15, 2019
Standard Rate until February 15, 2020
Final Rate until June 15, 2020

Congress: July 16-17th, 2020.

CALL FOR PAPERS DEADLINE
1st CFP until May 6, 2019
2nd CFP until September 6, 2019
3rd CFP until February 1, 2020
FINAL CFP until June 1, 2020
REGISTRATION DEADLINE
Super Discount Rate until June 3, 2019
Early Rate until September 20, 2019
Standard Rate until February 15, 2020
Final Rate until June 15, 2020

Highlighted Theme

Migration, today’s topic and always

Migration, legal or not, free or forced, is one of the great subjects of all time. Humanity has been set through millenarian migratory flows. From the ancient world, civilizations of the Mediterranean and the Middle East have emerged and disappeared due to great human migrations. Of course, not all migrations are the same. There are discussions about its benefits and detriments. For example, many governments are trying to either contain or, at times, encourage migration flows. We are not exempt from those who associate migration with the worst social problems. If governments reserve the right to decide who enters their territory, people and families will take care of their own livelihoods and life where possible. Some of the catalytic agents of migration are the economic and developmental inequalities between countries. At present, it has become very common to explain migration as part globalization. The central subject of this event deals with this counterpoint of ideas. There are intranational, international and transnational migrations, which cross borders, real or symbolic, and enrich, but also divide countries, cultures, groups, genres and ethnicities, among others.

Tema destacado 2018

Migration, today’s topic and always

Migration, legal or not, free or forced, is one of the great subjects of all time. Humanity has been set through millenarian migratory flows. From the ancient world, civilizations of the Mediterranean and the Middle East have emerged and disappeared due to great human migrations. Of course, not all migrations are the same. There are discussions about its benefits and detriments. For example, many governments are trying to either contain or, at times, encourage migration flows. We are not exempt from those who associate migration with the worst social problems. If governments reserve the right to decide who enters their territory, people and families will take care of their own livelihoods and life where possible. Some of the catalytic agents of migration are the economic and developmental inequalities between countries. At present, it has become very common to explain migration as part globalization. The central subject of this event deals with this counterpoint of ideas. There are intranational, international and transnational migrations, which cross borders, real or symbolic, and enrich, but also divide countries, cultures, groups, genres and ethnicities, among others.

Other Themes

Cultural Studies

  • Role of social, political, and cultural interactions in the development of identity.
  • Personal identity as a function of an individual’s culture, time, place, geography, interaction with groups, influences from institutions, and lived experiences.
  • Role of diversity within and among cultures.
  • Aspects of culture such as belief systems, religious faith, or political ideals as influences on other parts of a culture such as its institutions or literature, music, and art.
  • Cultural diffusion and change over time as facilitating different ideas and beliefs.

History, Geography, Humans and the Environment

  • History as a formal study that applies research methods.
  • Reading, reconstructing, and interpreting events.
  • Analyzing causes and consequences of events and developments.
  • Considering competing interpretations of events.
  • Relationship between human populations and the physical world (people, places, and environments).
  • Impact of human activities on the environment.
  • Interactions between regions, locations, places, people, and environments.
  • Spatial patterns of place and location.

Development and Transformation of Social Structures

  • The natural and the social: interdisciplinary studies.
  • Role of social class, systems of stratification, social groups, and institutions.
  • Role of gender, race, ethnicity, education, class, age, and religion in defining social structures within a culture.
  • Social and political inequalities.
  • Expansion and access of rights through concepts of justice and human rights.
  • The influence of education.
  • The role of the media.

Power, Authority, and Governance

  • Power, Authority, and Governance.
  • Purposes, characteristics, and functions of various governance systems as they are practiced.
  • Individual rights and responsibilities as protected and challenged within the context of majority rule.
  • Fundamental principles and values of constitutional democracy.
  • Origins, uses, and abuses of power.
  • Conflict, diplomacy, and war.
  • The role of mass media and the Internet.

Civic Ideals and Practices

  • Basic freedoms, rights and responsibilities of citizens in democracies.
  • Role of the citizen in the community and nation, and as a member of the global community.
  • Civic participation and engagement.
  • Respect for diversity.
  • Civic ideals and practices in countries other than democracies.
  • Struggle for rights, access to citizenship rights, and universal human rights.

Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems

  • Production, distribution, and consumption.
  • Scarcity of resources and the challenges of meeting wants and needs.
  • Supply/demand and the coordination of individual choices.
  • Economic systems. Economic policies.
  • Trade, interdependence, and globalization.
  • Role of government in the economy.
  • Personal finance.

Science, Technology, and Innovation

  • Scientific and intellectual theories, findings, discoveries, and philosophies.
  • Applications of science and innovations in transportation, communication, military technology, navigation, agriculture, and industrialization.
  • Relationship between science, technology, and innovation and social, cultural, and economic change.
  • Social construction of science and technology.

Global Connections and Exchange

  • Past, current, and likely future global connections and interactions.
  • Cultural diffusion; the spread of ideas, beliefs, technology, and goods.
  • Role of technology.
  • Benefits/consequences of global interdependence (social, political, economic).
  • Causes and patterns of migration.
  • Tension between national interests and global priorities.